Business

Uganda: Child Labour Remains Uganda’s Unspoken Dirty Secret


Child labour is a major problem in Uganda, with an estimated 2.2 million children under the age of 18 working in hazardous conditions.

The most common forms of child labour in Uganda include agriculture, mining, and domestic work.

Children who work in hazardous conditions are at risk of injury, illness, and exploitation. They may also miss out on education, which can have a negative impact on their future opportunities.

The Ugandan government has taken some steps to address child labor, but more needs to be done.

The government needs to enforce existing laws, provide more education and training opportunities for children, and create more jobs for adults.

Agriculture is the most common sector for child labor in Uganda. Children work on farms, plantations, and in the fishing industry. They often work long hours, in dangerous conditions, and for low wages.

Child labour is also a problem in the mining industry in Uganda. Children work in gold, silver, and tin mines, often in dangerous conditions. They may be exposed to toxic chemicals, work in tunnels that are prone to collapse, and carry heavy loads.

Domestic work is another common form of child labor in Uganda. Children work as housemaids, cooks, and nannies. They often work long hours, with little or no pay. They may also be subjected to physical and emotional abuse.

Child labour has a number of negative effects on children. It can lead to injury, illness, and exploitation. It can also prevent children from attending school, which can have a negative impact on their future opportunities.